VetLink Mobile Imaging Services

We are here to collaborate with veterinarians and veterinary clinic staff in order to provide pet owners with the best possible outcome. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are minimally invasive techniques to aid in achieving a diagnosis, and in some pets, provide therapeutic intervention. In many pets, aspiration or biopsy is also recommended, which is usually performed with ultrasound guidance or via endoscopy. Although shaving is required for most ultrasound examinations, sedation is only occasionally needed.

Ultrasound

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Abdominal Ultrasound

This is a thorough assessment of the entire abdominal
cavity. Assessment includes the liver, gallbladder, bile duct, stomach, spleen,
kidneys, ureters if visible, adrenal glands, urinary bladder +/- prostate,
visible urethra, colon, pancreas, small intestine, lymph nodes, mesentery, and
vasculature; reproductive organs are assessed if present. Abdominal fluid can
be assessed for amount and echogenicity.

Urogenital Ultrasound

This assessment should be reserved for young animals with
signs limited to the urogenital tract, such as suspected urolithiasis or
chronic urinary tract infection. Organs assessed include the kidneys, ureters
if visible, urinary bladder, visible urethra, and any reproductive organs.

Gastrointestinal Ultrasound

This assessment should be reserved for young animals with a
strong suspicion of acute gastrointestinal disease, such as a suspected
gastrointestinal foreign body. Organs assessed include the stomach, small
intestine and colon. This should not be requested in pets with chronic gastrointestinal
signs or in older pets.

Thoracic Ultrasound

A thoracic ultrasound is recommended in pets with thoracic
masses, pulmonary masses or consolidation, and/or pleural effusion. This
ultrasound includes a thorough assessment of the entire thoracic cavity, but
does not provide information about heart enlargement or function.

Thyroid/Parathyroid Ultrasound

This assessment is requested in pets diagnosed with primary
hyperparathyroidism, or with suspected thyroid carcinoma or other thyroid
masses. It is not recommended for cats with hyperthyroidism unless thyroid
carcinoma is suspected.

Cervical Ultrasound

A cervical ultrasound is recommended for pets with cervical
swelling, masses, suspected cervical abscesses, or for laryngeal disease such as
suspected laryngeal masses. The entire ventral cervical region, including the
larynx, is included.

Soft Tissue Ultrasound

A soft tissue ultrasound is utilized in pets with soft
tissue masses or swellings. These are often present in pets with neoplasia,
abscesses, or cellulitis, therefore ultrasound-guided aspiration is often
recommended in these pets. Some pets will warrant coagulation testing prior to
aspiration.

Ultrasound Guided Aspiration or Biopsy

If an abnormality is found on ultrasound examination, it is
often beneficial to obtain samples to aid in diagnosis. This typically requires
sedation, although some pets may require a short general anesthetic. Samples
can be obtained via aspiration (using a small gauge needle and syringe for
suction), or biopsy (using a biopsy needle or catheter assistance). Obtained
material can be submitted for cytology/histology assessment, and/or culture.
Some pets will require an assessment of coagulation prior to sampling.

Thoracocentesis, Pericardiocentesis, and Abdominocentesis

If fluid is noted in the pleural space, pericardial space,
or abdominal cavity, a procedure can be performed to obtain samples and reduce
the volume. Thoracocentesis, pericardiocentesis, and abdominocentesis require
sedation and may also utilize local anesthesia. Obtained fluid can be submitted
for cytology and/or culture.

Endoscopy

Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy / Foreign Body Retrieval

 

Endoscopic evaluation of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum are indicated in pets with disease suspected, or proven/high suspicion of foreign material, in these regions. Many foreign objects can be removed endoscopically, avoiding the requirement for surgery. Pets with chronic vomiting, diarrhea, hematemesis, and/or weight loss can benefit from endoscopic sampling of the stomach and duodenum, once other diseases have be ruled out via lab work and ultrasound. This is a day procedure that requires full general anesthesia and typically takes 10-15 minutes. Samples are obtained for histopathology.

Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

 

Endoscopic evaluation of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum and colon are indicated in pets with chronic vomiting, diarrhea, hematemesis/hematochezia, and/or weight loss. These pets can benefit from endoscopic sampling of the stomach and duodenum, once other diseases have be ruled out via lab work and ultrasound. This is a day procedure that requires full general anesthesia and typically takes 15-30 minutes. Samples are obtained for histopathology.

Colonoscopy

 

 

Endoscopic evaluation of the colon is indicated in pets with disease suspected to be localized only to the colon. This is typically pets with hematochezia or a palpable colonic abnormality. This is a day procedure that requires full general anesthesia and typically takes 10-15 minutes. Samples are obtained for histopathology.

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Additional Procedures

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Arthrocentesis

 

Obtaining samples of joint fluid can aid in the diagnosis of septic arthritis and polyarthritis. This technique require deep sedation or brief general anesthesia. Samples are collected for cytology and culture.

Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy

 

Obtaining samples of bone marrow for cytology and histopathology are needed in pets with suspected primary bone marrow disease such as pancytopenia, myelodysplasia, and leukemia. This sampling requires a short general anesthesia and local anesthesia. Samples are obtained for cytology and histopathology. Please note that we do not have equipment for bone marrow sampling in cats.

Urohydropropulsion

 

In female dogs with small uroliths present, it is possible to remove them non-invasively with urohydropropulsion. This technique requires deep sedation and utilizes ultrasound guidance to ensure all uroliths are voided. Collected uroliths, if large enough, can be submitted for analysis and culture.

Biopsy/Aspiration Interpretation

 

 

Once you receive results from a biopsy or aspiration, we can interpret these results for you and make recommendations for an interpretation fee. 

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